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Negative pressure therapy may reduce reoperation for infection in spine surgery

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Negative pressure therapy may reduce reoperation for infection in spine surgery


August 19, 2022

1 min read


Source/Disclosures

Source:

Oyekan AA, et al. Paper 949. Presented at: Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Meeting; Aug. 5-6, 2022; Pittsburgh (hybrid meeting).


Disclosures:
Tang reports no relevant financial disclosures.


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Results presented here showed use of closed incision negative pressure therapy in spine surgery may reduce the incidence of reoperation for surgical site infections or noninfectious wound complications.

“[Closed incision negative pressure therapy] may be an effective tool for decreasing these types of wound complications and infections in spine surgery,” Melissa Yunting Tang, MD, resident physician in the department of orthopedic surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said during her presentation at the Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Meeting. “The next step is to obtain pricing data to understand the financial implications of this therapy.”

Melissa Yunting Tang

Melissa Yunting Tang

Anthony A. Oyekan

Anthony A. Oyekan

Tang, Anthony A. Oyekan, MD, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent spine surgery with closed incision negative pressure therapy between July 2017 and July 2021. Tang noted patients in the closed incision negative pressure therapy group — or the incisional vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) cohort — were age and gender matched to patients who received traditional dressings.

“We collected demographic information, including age, gender, BMI, prior surgeries, smoking status, social and medical comorbidities via the Charlson Comorbidity Index,” Tang said.

Data were reviewed for need for revision surgery at the same surgical site as the index surgery, the reason for the revision and any other spine related complications that did not require a return to the OR within the 90-day postoperative period, according to Tang.

“Surgical site infections were defined as culture positive findings after reoperation,” Tang said.

Tang noted patients in the closed incision negative pressure therapy group had reduced incidence of noninfectious wound complications when compared with patients who received traditional dressings. She added patients in the closed incision negative pressure therapy group also had less surgical site infections that required reoperations.

“Patients in the incisional VAC cohort had overall higher BMIs but, otherwise, there were no differences in comorbidities or surgical indications between the two groups,” Tang said.